07922 752 404

Freshen Up Your Kitchen Cupboards

Itching to get your dream kitchen but currently have no budget? We know it’s a pain that you want your dream kitchen however if you’re desperate to get your kitchen looking fabulous there is always another way… freshen up what you’ve already got. Why? A tin of paint is significantly cheaper then even the cheapest of new kitchen cabinets, so as they say… Make Do and Mend!

What do you need?

  • strong cleaner
  • sandpaper
  • a paintbrush
  • a little elbow grease and excitement
  • What Paint? Go for White or Bright

    If your kitchen cabinets have been in your house since the dark ages the chances are that they are well and truly dated, especially if your cabinets are a dark colour. Dark colours drain the light out of rooms and if you have a small kitchen dark colours are a no go. Instead revamp with a lick of white paint or if you can’t stand the brilliant white glow, go for another bright colour. Not only do bright colours reflect light, they also give the illusion that the room is bigger than it actually is. Double win!

    What you do have to make sure of though is that you are using paint for kitchen cabinets, especially if you don’t want to have to keep going over it, redoing it several months down the line or have difficulty cleaning the cabinets.

    Or to be more specific, BHG.com say “You'll need to choose between acrylic enamel paint and alkyd paint. Acrylic, or water-base, paints are low-fume and clean up easily with water. Alkyd, or oil-base, paints require good ventilation because the paint contains solvents that can irritate your lungs and make you feel sick. Alkyd options require mineral spirits for cleanup, but they provide a hard, durable paint finish. Whichever you use, buy the best quality paint you can afford for a lasting finish.”

    Remove Drawers and Doors

    Not only does it make painting easier, but if you paint over the hinges and fixtures it makes their functionality difficult as the paint can cause the hinges to become sticky or stiff. If you are using your hinges again make sure to put them somewhere easy to locate later. Use a cordless drill or screwdriver to remove hinges and hardware. If your cabinets have adjustable shelves, be sure to remove those as well as the hardware that goes with it.

    Prepping the Surfaces

    Clean the faces of cabinet boxes and drawers and both sides of doors and shelves with a product that removes dirt and grease, such as trisodium phosphate (TSP). Follow manufacturer instructions on the packaging, mixing water and TSP in a bucket as directed. Make sure to wear protective goggles and rubber gloves. Apply the TSP-and-water mixture with a sponge to clean.

    Once the cabinets are clean and dry, use a putty knife to fill any nicks or dents with spackling compound or wood filler; let dry. Sand the surface with 120- to 220-grit sandpaper to dull the surface and smooth down any imperfections. To sand all the contours of panelled doors, try using a contoured sander, a small sponge wrapped with sandpaper, or a commercial sanding sponge. Use a tack cloth or damp rag to remove dust after sanding.

    Or if your old cabinets are in good nick and don’t need sanding but only need the old gloss removing you can purchase a liquid deglosser which removes the glossy finish on cabinets.

    Prime

    Use painter's tape or masking tape to protect the wall or backsplash tile from paint drips or messes. Cover the countertop with an old cloth. Use a roller or paintbrush to prime the faces of cabinet boxes and drawers and both sides of doors. If your cabinets have a lot of detailing, it will be easier to use a tapered brush. A roller works well on larger flat surfaces and flat doors. Apply one light coat of primer and leave to dry.

    The Fun Bit - Painting!

    Cabinets

    Make sure your paint is well-stirred, then pour the paint into a paint tray then load a roller or brush with paint. Start with doors, as these will take longer to paint because you'll need to let it dry before you turn them over to paint the other side. Apply paint to cabinets in light coats. Painting thinner coats mean fewer drips for a high-quality paint job. Be prepared to apply at least two coats per side.

    If your shelves are adjustable and the inside of your cabinets needs a fresh coat of paint, now is the time to start painting them, as well however, if they’ve never been painted, don't start now.

    Drawers

    You'll want to paint the front of the drawer but not the drawer's sides or glide hardware. Use tape again to protect the rest of the drawer from errant brush strokes. Set cabinet drawers on their ends. They should balance easily in this position. Apply paint in light coats using a brush, allowing it to dry completely between each coat.

    Cabinet Box

    Use tape to protect the wall or backsplash tile from paint drips or messes. Cover the countertop with an old cloth. Use a roller or paintbrush to paint the frame and sides of the cabinetry unit or cabinet box. If your cabinets have a lot of detailing, it will be easier to use a tapered brush. A roller works well on larger flat surfaces and flat-panel doors. Again, apply the paint in light coats and allowit to dry completely between each coat.

    Simply put it back together and voila! You have a new kitchen!

    Of course if you don’t want to go through all of that hassle, you can simply get the professionals to do it, but a little DIY and determination can go a long way!

    Latest Photos

    View all photos

    Testimonials

    JMK Interior Finishing Ltd recently completed two bathrooms in my home. A shower/wet room and a bathroom with freestanding bath. The fittings and tiles were chosen by me. The materials used by JMK were top quality. As was the workmanship i.e plumbing and tiling. They were prompt polite clean workers and very professional.
    Judith Routledge

    View all Testimonials